Your First 100 Tagalog Sentences – Free E-Book (No email required)

Talk Tagalog’s Famous Free E-Book – Your First 100 Tagalog Sentences

It’s so free, you don’t even need to give me your email address for it! Here it is mga kaibigan! Just click the link or the picture of the cover to download it.

your first 100 tagalog sentences

Your-First-100-Tagalog-Sentences.pdf

I swear on my two front teeth this e-book is not trying to sell you anything, nor does it contain any marketing links, nor does it have any form of malware. Please feel free to hunt me down and punch out my two front teeth if it does. Ouch! Maybe not. Uhmm.. Okay, if I deserve it.

I wrote this free e-book so that the Tagalog learner can have an enjoyable no BS phrasebook to learn Tagalog and have something to take along his or her travels to the Philippines!

I’m a total phrasebook junkie. I like phrasebooks so much I had to write my own for one of my native languages. I’ve been there, and I’ve done that. I’ve traveled the world struggling to say in Chinese, Japanese or Cambodian or whatever local language “Can I please have a glass of water?” or “Where is the toilet?” (this one is difficult to mime). Sometimes, all you need is a phrasebook that isn’t six hundred pages thick.

I know what it’s like to study a language a couple of months before an overseas trip only to find out, uh oh, I don’t know how to ask for a glass of water. I don’t want that to happen to you. You are suave. You are slick. You know the sentences that matter.

Learning through phrase books is actually quite good when you’re starting out in a language. I myself am a fan of phrasebooks when learning a language. While others might shy away from using phrasebooks for serious language learning, here are some reasons why I think phrase books are actually quite effective for language learning…

Why Are Phrasebooks Essential for Learning a Language?

First, you can be sure that the sentences they include in the phrase book are commonly used ones. Thus, there’s a good chance you can use the sentences you learn in real life situations. This makes studying the sentences in phrasebooks very efficient – the most bang for your buck and your time.

Second, because a phrasebook was most likely written by a native speaker, you can be sure that the sentences are correct in terms of grammar and idiomatic use. In other words, you can shout them out with confidence. I’ve been studying foreign languages for a number of years, but I always have a phrasebook in the local language handy.

Third, phrasebooks cut through complicated grammar rules and sentence structures. Phrasebooks just give you as much as you need to know to put in a good sentence or two at the right situation, quickly increasing your fluency. You can put whatever you need to learn to good use at once.

Fourth, even as you become more advanced in your languages, phrasebooks are a great reference for set phrases as they are said in normal everyday situations. In English are a great number of ways to ask for the bathroom. Some ways sound silly “Sir, may you be kind enough to direct me towards the most spatially proximate lavatory” and some sound natural “Hey buddy, where’s the bathroom?” Same goes with Tagalog. Learn the real stuff real people use.

So go ahead, download my free e-book.

Your-First-100-Tagalog-Sentences.pdf

This is my e-book Your First 100 Tagalog Sentences¬†on Amazon for the kind souls who can throw some coins in my direction. But if you ain’t got any change to spare, again it’s available absolutely for free above. But if you want to support me, buy the most updated Kindle version on Amazon for a silly $2.99 by clicking on that funny Amazon thingy below this paragraph which will take you straight to my book on Amazon’s website. That will mean you really love us. Your support means I can churn out more quirky lessons and articles. Salamat!

Something wrong with the book? So, you think it’s a steamin’ pile of you-know-what? Send me feedback through our contact page.

Suggested Further Reading:

Why Should You Learn Tagalog?

Tagalog Prefixes, Infixes, Suffixes: Why Tagalog Verbs Drive Language Learners Crazy

Listening Comprehension Exercise: Talk With Lala “Sales Lady Attack!”

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Some stuff some other dudes are selling on Amazon that you might find useful. I’ll probably get a couple of cents at no additional cost to you if you buy something from Amazon after clicking any of these Amazon thingies below this sentence:

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